Poets and Presenters

Demian DinéYazhi´

Demian DineYazhi, photographed by Patrick Weishampel

Demian DinéYazhi´ (born 1983) is a Portland-based Diné transdisciplinary artist born to the clans Naasht'ézhí Tábąąhá (Zuni Clan Water's Edge) & Tódích'íí'nii (Bitter Water). His work is rooted in Radical Indigenous Queer Feminist ideology, landscape representation, memory, HIV/AIDS-related art & activism, gender, identity, & sexuality, Indigenous Survivance, & Decolonization. He received his BFA in Intermedia Arts from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2014. Demian is the founder & director of the artist/activist initiative, R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment, which is dedicated to education, perseverance, & evolution of Indigenous art & culture, as well as co-director for the forthcoming zine, Locusts: A Post-Queer Nation Zine. He is the recipient of grants from Evergreen State College (2014, 2016), PICA - Portland Institute of Contemporary Art (2014,2016), Art Matters Foundation (2015), and Potlatch Fund (2016).
Follow Demian's work at: www.demiandineyazhi.com // Instagram: @heterogeneoushomosexual

Events:
The Poetics of Climate Change: Poetry in the Anthropocene

Claire Hero

Claire Hero is the author of Sing, Mongrel and three chapbooks: Cabinet; afterpastures, winner of the 2007 Caketrain Chapbook Competition, and Dollyland.  Her poems and prose have appeared in Atticus Review, Bennington Review, Black Warrior Review, Cincinnati Review, Denver Quarterly, and elsewhere.  She teaches at SUNY New Paltz.

Events:
The Poetics of Climate Change: Poetry in the Anthropocene

Deborah Poe

poebot

Deborah Poe is the author of the poetry collections keep (forthcoming from Dusie Press), the last will be stone, too (Stockport Flats), Elements (Stockport Flats), and Our Parenthetical Ontology (CustomWords), as well as a novella in verse, Hélène (Furniture Press). Her visual works—including video poems and handmade book objects—have been exhibited at Pace University (New York City), Casper College (Wyoming), Center for Book Arts (New York City), University of Arizona Poetry Center (Tucson), University of Pennsylvania Kelly Writers House at Brodsky Gallery (Philadelphia), and ONN/OF “a light festival” (Seattle), as well as online with Bellingham ReviewElective AffinitiesPeep/ShowTrickhouse, and The Volta. Associate professor of English at Pace University, Pleasantville, Deborah directs the creative writing program and founded and curates the annual Handmade/Homemade Exhibit. She has also taught at Western Washington University, Binghamton University, SUNY, the Port Townsend Writer’s Workshop in Washington, Richard Hugo House, and Casa Libre en La Solana in Tucson. Deborah served as Distinguished Visiting Writer for Seattle University during Winter Term 2016.

Events:
The Poetics of Climate Change: Poetry in the Anthropocene
DUSIE Pop-Up Reading

Amber Atiya

Amber Atiya is a multidisciplinary poet whose creative practice incorporates elements of performance, book arts, and visual arts. Her work has appeared in various journals including Boston Review, PEN America, and Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color, and is forthcoming in the Bettering American Poetry Anthology and Dismantled Almosts: A 21st Century Anthology of Female Poets. She has received fellowships and residencies from Poets House and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Amber’s poems have been nominated for Best New Poets 2015 and selected for Best of the Net 2014. A proud native Brooklynite, she is a member of a women’s writing group that will be celebrating 15 years in 2017. Her chapbook the fierce bums of doo-wop (Argos Books) was chosen for The Volta’s Best Books of 2014.

Events:
The Poetics of Climate Change: Poetry in the Anthropocene