Events with Descriptions

Thursday, Apr 18, 12:00pm

The Dragonfly Poetry and Performance Ritual Space, 3921 St. Claude

With:

Open Studio, meet-and-great, and Registration at The Dragonfly, Noon-5PM


Thursday, Apr 18, 7:00pm

Dogfish, 2448 N. Villere

With:

NOPF partners with the Dogfish reading series to present our opening performance featuring Oliver Baez Bendorf, Lee Ann Brown, Henk Rossouw and Chen Chen. 


Friday, Apr 19, 12:00pm

The Dragonfly Poetry and Performance Ritual Space, 3921 St. Claude

With:

Marathon Open Mic at The Dragonfly, Noon-5PM


Friday, Apr 19, 7:00pm

Café Istanbul (in the Healing Center 2372 St Claude)

With:

Friday Night International Feature featuring performances by Pierre Joris and Nicole Peyrafitte, Salgado Maranhäo (Brazil) and translator Alexis Levitin, Isabel de la Fuente (Ururguay), Javier Etchevarren (Uruguay) and translator Jesse Lee Kercheval, Andrea Jurjević reading Olja Savičević (Croatia), and more at Cafe Istanbul, 7-10PM

 


Friday, Apr 19, 10:00pm

Barrister's Gallery, 2331 St. Claude

With:

Opening Reception and Party, International Visual Poetry exhibit curated by JS Makkos and Joseph Bienvenu. Barrister’s Gallery hosts the opening of VERBIVOCOVISUAL: Visual & Multimedia Poetry Show from 10PM onward. Visual poetry in a variety of media will be on display from local, national and international poets and artists, with multimedia work presented through a small network of projectors and visual CTR displays. There will be spontaneous readings and musical performances occurring through the course of the night, with complimentary wine and a cocktails by donation. 10 PM--


Saturday, Apr 20, 9:00am

RM 250, Healing Center

With:

This poetry reading will feature constraint-based poems by Dora Malech, Lo Kwa Mei-en, Amber Nelson, and Kristi Maxwell. Malech will read anagram poems of Sylvia Plath’s “Metaphor" from her new book Stet; Mei-en will read poems from a nonce form project titled "The Nightingale," a pantoum-based sonnet sequence responding to Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale of that title; Amber Nelson will read from Sexiest Man Alive, which uses found language from interviews with People Magazine’s Sexiest Men Alive; and Kristi Maxwell will read from a new lipogram series that uses endangered species as each piece’s starting point, exploring the ways absences and vulnerabilities manifest in the language of a poem. The reading will be followed by a Q&A about constraint-based writing—its challenges and rewards.


Saturday, Apr 20, 9:00am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

The epic is one of the oldest poetic forms. Most of us are familiar with Gilgamesh and the Odyssey yet, in contemporary poetry, these massive poems may or may not take on such structured narratives with archetypal protagonists. Today's long form poetry can be anti-narrative and be either lyrical or not. Some long poems are verse novels or verse dramas. While other long poems are more disjunctive and disruptive. We want to explore the many ideas of what is possible for today's long poems, epics and poetic series. As writers of long poems, we wish to discuss not only our own work but also those poets/poems who have tackled this form and length. Among these writers are Genet, HD, Renee Gladman and Cathy Park Hong. This discussion will include an exploration of sequencing and how time/movement occurs or is removed/slowed. We will also discuss the interiority of a piece minus the focus on plot. How a voice/self/idea relates to language and reality. Finally, there is the topic of failure. What is an epic failing? 

 


Saturday, Apr 20, 9:00am

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

In Egyptian mythology, the Phoenix is a sacred firebird that has the power to regenerate when injured. She is not invulnerable, but she is invincible. She has the power to lose everything, experience a mortal wound, and rise again. When she is ready to die, she builds a nest of cinnamon, lights it on fire, and burns herself to death. From the ashes, a new Phoenix rises unharmed, healed, reborn. The writers on this panel will present works that engage with current and/or historical social crises, exploring the personal as a site of activism. 


Saturday, Apr 20, 10:05am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

This panel is comprised of authors whose commitments entail vital work with issues from capital punishment to homelessness, from the fight against mass incarceration to the fight against ecological devastation.  Participants will share from their creative work and then engage with each other and the audience on such questions as representation, how writing instigates community and change, and the intersection of aesthetic and ethical practices.  We will also discuss how issues of privilege and power play out in literary debates over aesthetics and activism.

For many, art-making and social activism are not separate engagements.  This panel offers models of creative writing that catalyze and support community action.  The participants propose strategies for responding to social, environmental, and political crises.  We also raise necessary questions about privilege and power in literary communities.  Some writers may embrace activism as a choice, while others view it as a necessity born of oppression. We explore how to navigate and support those differences


Saturday, Apr 20, 10:05am

Mezzanine, Healing Center

With:

The participant enters the 3-D space (spray-painted panels + color oil painting entitled Self-Partrait creating the sides, thus creating a large “puzzle box,” placed outside the smaller puzzle box containing the puzzle pieces--
one side is part of the actual puzzle, the other side is sprayed black on which I have written a word.  This smaller box sits atop a table/surface).  There are 300 words total.  The list of 300 words will be on display on an adjacent wall/table.  Ideally, video images of people arranging their pieces will be shown on another adjacent wall.

The participant chooses as many or as few pieces as they wish without looking at the words, and once picked, word pieces are arranged as desired on the table.  This becomes the "Partrait," their own creative work ( a "part" of themselves created from the collective pieces). They are welcome to take a photo of their arranged words, but once they are finished, they must return the puzzle pieces back to the small black puzzle box. 

After going through this process, the participant has not only been a product of the creative writing process of the installation, but he/she has physically BECOME part of the landscape of the installation…. a personified “puzzle piece” among many inside the collective “puzzle box.”

* * *

“Partraits of a Puzzle in Pieces:”

Partraits=word creations, parts of a collective whole, the Puzzle.

Puzzle pieces=the individual


Saturday, Apr 20, 10:05am

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

With:

Three noted translators discuss their biggest questions and concerns for translation and the translation landscape today. They will talk about their own work, read from it, and comment on how they hope to see translation move along in the growing xenophobic world. As part of this panel Nicole and Pierre will discuss their latest translation into French of Anne Waldman’s book to come out with APIC Hditeur in Algiers.


Saturday, Apr 20, 10:05am

RM 250, Healing Center

With:

Language serves to both reflect our understanding of the world and, in many senses, to define it. Our panel are interested in exploring the uses, limitations, and possibilities of (re)presenting gender and voice via poetry.

Steve Bellin-Oka will talk about using found text from the trials and news coverage of Matthew Shepard's murder in recent poems as a way of subverting entrenched binaries of homo/heterosexuality and heteronormativity, and of how particularly American (false) gender binaries are also rooted in a region's mythos (both Wyoming specifically and the "heartland" of America generally).

Chen Chen will talk about using Mandarin Chinese alongside English in recent work, including the craft and politics of code-switching or translanguaging, and how patriarchy and homophobia are built into/across languages, as well as possibilities for reimagining and pushing back. Chen is interested in how gender intersects with race and what happens when writing from/to a distinctly queer Asian American perspective. 

Anna De Vaul will talk about an ongoing project centered around writing and publishing using a male heteronym, in terms of submitting/publishing using both male and female personas and in terms of the (fake) male poet's first collection, which interrogates and subverts ideas of gender, voice, agency, and heteronormativity in “traditional" and “canonical” literary relationship narratives.

Veronica Golos will talk about using various forms and techniques in Rootwork, including historical research and documents, epistolary persona poems in the voices of John Brown and the mostly unknown Mary Day Brown, and poems in voices of ghosts and runaways. Veronica will discuss how this creates, in the restrained voices of the 1800's, a link between the reader and the intimate thoughts, feelings, and relations of abolitionists of the day, and brings from obscurity Mary Day Brown.

During the panel, each poet will read a selection of relevant poems and discuss their work in the context of experimentation with gender, voice, and language.


Saturday, Apr 20, 10:05am

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

For many transracial adoptees of color, the concept of kinship is complicated. Separated from our birth families, isolated from other adoptees, and growing up in a country that insists on recognizing us as foreigners, finding community can be an enduring challenge. This is why, when four adoptee poets met through Kundiman, they refused to allow distance to get in their way. From New Orleans, LA, Miami, FL, Brooklyn, NY, and a yacht traversing the East Coast, these poets began holding regular gatherings via Google Hangout in order to keep in touch, support each other through challenges, and share personal and literary triumphs and letdowns. These gatherings ultimately evolved into a book club, where they reflect and think critically about how marginalized histories are represented in literature and the role adopted writers play in telling and uplifting adoptee narratives and perspectives. On this panel, we will talk about the significance of our book club as a source of finding kinship, and we will each read a short sample of poems.


Saturday, Apr 20, 11:15am

RM 250, Healing Center

With:

There are no symbols in dreams. The lion in your dreams is not a symbol of a lion--but a creature meant to inspire terror. My goal in working with dreams over the past 15 years is to strip the crust of interpretation and bring dreams back alive. 
We can do the same operation with poetry. Then instead of symbols, maybe we'll have lions again.
The potency of poetry is ruined by the flatness of explanation, the sterility of reactivity, and the curse of norms.  By looking at dreams closely,  we can restore our sense of the primacy of image and feeling in our poems. We can learn to revise our poems according to our dreams.
For this workshop, led by respected poet and dream worker Rodger Kamenetz, bring a fresh dream to discuss and a poem you are working on.  We will learn about the vertical and the horizontal in dreams and in poems, and read dream poems by  Alice Notley, Jean Valentine, David Shapiro.

One hour. Limited to 15 participants.


Saturday, Apr 20, 11:15am

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

Cultural and political differences between northern and southern California have long been part of the history of the state of California. Though divided between an anti-slavery north and a pro-slavery south from the moment it became a state, both the north and south practiced enslavement of Chinese, Black, Indigenous, and Latinx laborers. This legacy of oppression has consistently been accompanied, in both regions, by radical forms of resistance and movements against dominant forces. Poetry from the Bay Area and northern California has played a crucial role in the history of poetry in the U.S., while the poetry of southern California has remained much less well known. This group reading features poets living around the state whose work has been influenced by very different, and often conflicting, literary, cultural, and political visions of California, visions that reflect, in ways that are uniquely Californian, some of the same cultural and political divides currently causing so much national conflict. Yet people in California have long been involved in trying to imagine and create the future; this reading will explore how poetic influence and interconnection can be a way of reaching across, and breaking down, historical divisions and borders.


Saturday, Apr 20, 11:15am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

What drives a poet all the way across a page? What pushes a poet to run up that flight onto the more public platform of prose? What if a poet rents a room in the essay and scrawls midnight poems across its walls? Come see how five poets––Ching-In Chen, Jennifer Firestone, Muriel Leung, Dana Teen Lomax, and Sarah Rosenthal––mess with the essay form in order to investigate catastrophe spliced with courage, love, and inexplicable flashes of beauty.


Saturday, Apr 20, 11:15am

Art Gallery, Healing Center

With:

Small press poets perform their work.


Saturday, Apr 20, 11:15am

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

With:

Join poets from Bloof Books and friends as we tune our antennae to the dark-erotic frequencies of the Jewish French-Egyptian poet, Joyce Mansour, Queen of the Extra-Surrealist Night, and read from, around, and into her thrumming/thrashing body of work. “Collect the bubbles / Hustle sour winds up the sidewalk / Suck the fresh flesh of the ruby,” Mansour wrote in Phallus & Mommies (1969), “Leave it screaming / No matter.” Her iconoclastic work— including Cris (Screams, 1953), Déchirures (Torn Apart, 1955), Trour Noirs (Black Holes, 1986), and Le Bleu des fonds (The Blue of the Deep, 1968)—is full of matter and bodies and the alterity of recklessness and propulsion. Poets will read from Mansour’s work and something from theirs that speaks to her influence. “Why should [you] wait in front of a closed door?” You shouldn’t. Join us.

 


Saturday, Apr 20, 12:15pm

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

With:

Our Saturday midday reading with catered lunch (gratis for paid participants) with readings by featured poets.


Saturday, Apr 20, 1:50pm

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

Environmental writing & ecopoetics frequently evoke the natural, and thus what society deems moral, appropriate, or pure. How do we reckon queerness & queer lives within these ecological systems? How can we subvert centuries of thought that define marginalized identities as unnatural by using these same ecological elements? Queer environmental writers combat transphobia, homophobia, racism, & misogyny through an ecological lens. A queering of ecopoetics allows writers to not only explore the world around us through our queerness, but also to engage with the myriad queer ecological processes that flourish in our diverse environments. In this intersectional roundtable, poets Amber Flora Thomas, Oliver Baez Bendorf, Lindsay Tigue, & Matty Layne Glasgow will discuss how their recent & forthcoming award-winning collections illuminate the queer magic of our world, deconstructing the heteronormativity & gender binaries so frequently invoked in ecopoetics & environmental writing. 


Saturday, Apr 20, 1:50pm

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

The Cosmic Collective will deliver, transmit and perform poems the center around magic, mysticism, the occult, spirituality, and realms beyond this earth.  We will incorporate and reveal our personal rituals, practices and engagements with the cosmos through our poems and energy.  This group gestures toward possibilities beyond what we normally "see" or perceive with our human minds.  


Saturday, Apr 20, 1:50pm

RM 250, Healing Center

With:

This event would feature readings by Sundress Publications authors Sarah A. Chavez, Hali F. Sofala-Jones, H.K. Hummel, and Sundress editor, Brynn Martin.

Sarah A. Chavez, a mestiza born and raised in the California Central Valley, is the author of the poetry collections, Hands That Break & Scar (Sundress Publications, 2017) and All Day, Talking (dancing girl press, 2014), selections of which were awarded the Susan Atefat Peckham Fellowship. Her work can be found or is forthcoming in the anthologies Xicanx: Mexican American Writers of the 21st Century and Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzalduan Borderlands as well as the journals Brevity, North American Review, VIDAAcentos Review, Atticus Review, and The Fourth River Tributaries Series, among other. She recently joined the faculty at the University of Washington Tacoma where she teaches creative writing and Latinx/Chicanx-focused courses. She serves as the poetry coordinator for Best of the Net Anthology and is a proud member of the Macondo Writers Workshop. 

Hali F. Sofala-Jones is a Samoan American teacher and writer. Her debut poetry collection, Afakasi | Half-Caste, is forthcoming from Sundress Publications in December 2018. She holds an MFA in Poetry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Her poems appear in Nimrod International Journal, The Bitter Oleander, CALYX, Blue Mesa ReviewThe Missouri Review, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of the Vreeland Prize in poetry, two Academy of American Poets prizes, a Pushcart Prize nomination, and several other honors and awards. Sofala-Jones teaches creative writing and literature at GC and serves as an assistant editor in poetry for Arts and Letters.

H.K. Hummel is the author of Lessons in Breathing Underwater (Sundress Publications, 2019) and Short-Form Creative Writing: A Writer's Guide and Anthology (Bloomsbury, 2018). She is an Assistant Professor of creative writing at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and one of the founding editors of Blood Orange Review. Her poems have recently appeared in Hudson ReviewMuseum of AmericanaBooth, and Iron Horse Review. Visit her website at www.hkhummel.com

Brynn Martin is a Kansas native living in Knoxville, where she recently received her MFA in poetry from the University of Tennessee and is the Reading Series Coordinator for Sundress Academy for the Arts. Her poetry has appeared in Public Pool and Contrary Magazine. She loves ee cummings and cats almost equally.


Saturday, Apr 20, 1:50pm

Art Gallery, Healing Center

With:

Poets perform their work.


Saturday, Apr 20, 3:00pm

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

Join our panel of poets and scholars who will read and discuss how writers of color employ the speculative to explore, enact, and magnify the histories and politics of bodily estrangement in contemporary poetics. Through critical and affective fabulations, we must often theorize and create what cannot be recovered under our current conditions. What are the potentialities then, and the limits of theorizing the recovery of our own bodies and those of our communities? What are the ethics of a totalizing subjection on one end, and erasure on the other?  Muriel Leung, Joseph Earl Thomas, Jonah Mixon-Webster and Rosana Cruz will read from their own work in progress and open up a conversation to build towards more progressive, strategic futures.


Saturday, Apr 20, 3:00pm

RM 250, Healing Center

With:

This workshop will have three components, or fields: 

Physical improv (40 min.)

The physical component, likely public but not necessarily, could take place outside (litter-sweeping or just a walk) or inside (a gallery walk or movement to three very different pieces of music).

Each option would emphasize improv (acting or not in response to the moment) and silence and listening (focused on noticing and feeling, not making small talk). 

Stillness (10 min.)

A quiet meditation

Art improv (40 min.)

An art session—drawing, writing, collaging. Here association would be emphasized, a keep-the-pen-moving type of moment.

Depending on time, we could share and give feedback. (30 min.)

If there’s even more time, we could then edit in the form of self-erasures—leaving the phrases/images with the most heat and white-outing extraneous connective tissue.

 

Proposed Improv:

Physical component: litter sweeping*

Art component: comics

 

—At the beginning of the workshop, to allow for late arrivals, we'll read three poems, say

-James Schuyler’s “Salute”

-Eileen Myles’s “Writing”

-Ross Gay’s “A Small Needful Fact”

—We’ll then walk around Healing Center environs, trying not to talk (i.e. CAConrad: “quietly shoo them away, you’re busy, you’re a poet”).

—Provide gloves and bags and instruct: if you see some trash, pick it up. Take photos if you’d like.

—We’ll stop periodically to sip some water, eat some snacks, and jot down notes of things we’ve seen, heard, thought, remembered, imagined, and wait for those of different speeds.

—Back in the classroom, we'll meditate. 

—Then we generate: I'll pass out index cards, 8 per person.

-On four we’ll draw: images we saw, were reminded of, imagined, etc.

-On four we'll write: text we heard, were reminded of, imagined, etc.

—We'll play with the sequence of the images and rearrange the text as captions under the images. Fun unexpected juxtapositions will occur.

—Now you have a comics page.

—Now you have an experience to write a poem about.

—Now you have an experience you've explored in various forms, so you

can think about

-What you liked about each form

-What was challenging

-When to repeat the practice, and what physical and art components you’ll pair 

 

*In the event of inclement weather, we’ll do an indoor gallery walk or movement session.


Saturday, Apr 20, 3:00pm

Art Gallery, Healing Center

With:

Epic Rites Press represents poetry that is raw, honest, and stripped down to its barest essence. Our mandate is a simple one: the right word next to the right word; the right line next to the right lineconnection through common experiences and common language. Our writing and performances represent poetry as it was meant to be experiencedurgent and pared down like a 911 call. Please join Wolfgang Carstens from Alberta, Canada, William Taylor Jr. from San Francisco, California, and Todd Cirillo from New Orleans, Louisiana for an evening of poetry from the infamous Epic Rites Press.

Saturday, Apr 20, 4:10pm

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

With:

A reading for poetry and bbs and ppl who like poetry and bbs. Not necessarily a reading of poems about bbs or even motherhood. Not necessarily an antidote to the isolation of being a mother-artist, although Spacewitch Collective members are mother-artists who gather regularly in person and virtually to talk about poetry and share spells for bb sleep. Sometimes we are a commune. What is a home? What is a mother? What is a woman? What is a bb? We have no answers. We gather and make poems.


Saturday, Apr 20, 4:10pm

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

Is the project-based book a moss or a mold? Books with singular exigencies have proliferated out of the world of experimental poetry and into major prizes and presses. Why? To interrogate? To not obfuscate? Project-based books provide a space and scope unhinged poems cannot, and on a planet wrought with damage and inequality, what better mode of investigating the big questions do we have? In this panel, five poets will discuss their own and others’ project-based books.


Saturday, Apr 20, 4:10pm

Art Gallery, Healing Center

With:

Featured poets perform their work.


Saturday, Apr 20, 4:10pm

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

Join poets Daniel Altenburg, Nik De Dominic, MC Hyland, Friedrich Kerksieck, and David Welch as they read new work out from three small presses (Spork Press, Small Fires Press, and Double Cross Press) that use historic letterpress printing techniques as part of their contemporary publishing platforms. In addition to reading their work, the poets and editors will discuss the intersection of the visual and literary arts, looking specifically toward the benefits of the book as a handmade artifact, and the community such work fosters and supports. 


Sunday, Apr 21, 9:00am

Rm 250, Healing Center

With:

Erasure poetry and art is gaining wider recognition as a means of engagement with politics, capitalism, and celebrity culture. Erasure can also be used as a means to engage more deeply with the literary texts we revere. Workshop participants will interact with a variety of texts using a variety of media (sharpies, whiteout, glitter, cutouts, etc.). We'll play with erasing texts that inspire strong emotions in us, erasure as a form of protest, and erasure as collaboration with the artists and work we admire. Workshop participants are encouraged, but not required, to bring along any texts they would like to work with. Otherwise, all workshop supplies will be provided by the facilitator, including source texts, erasure materials, and packets with examples of erasure work from a variety of poets and artists working in the field.


Sunday, Apr 21, 9:00am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

Poets Julia Johnson, Ben Kopel, Emily Pettit, Michelle Taransky, and Jordan Stempleman will discuss possibilities for creating points of entry for students and teachers to engage with various forms of difficulty, discomfort and estrangement. From Kenneth Koch’s imaginative writing prompts inviting possibility, to Ross Gay and Emily Skillings’s odes to idiosyncrasies, to image envelopes as a way to collage with words, to Dodie Bellamy’s reworking of Burroughs’ cut-ups through cunt-ups, we will point to past practices to describe our pedagogical commitment to teaching poetry to a wide range of audiences.

 


Sunday, Apr 21, 10:05am

Art Gallery, Healing Center

With:

In her essay “somewhere inbetween: Speaking-Through Contiguity” in the new Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, Marthe Reed (1958-2018) directs us to Timothy Morton’s reframing of human/other-than-human relationships as “drastically collective”—“All kinds of beings, from toxic waste to sea snails, are clamoring for our scientific, political, and artistic attention.” Marthe writes: “Escape from this truth lies through no doorway, no slippery construct of language or argument: ‘we’ are ‘it,’ inextricable from our circumstances. The point on which all else turns: within this ‘drastically collective’ condition, how, then…live? Indeed, how write?” For this 9th iteration of the Dusie Kollektiv, we ask you—poets, friends, and readers of Marthe Reed—to explore Marthe’s urgent question. “In times like these,” she writes in a revision of Rich, “it is necessary to embrace the ‘somewhere inbetween’ affording and sheltering difference not as distance but as intimacy.” We invite poets around the world to create digital chapbooks of the somewhere in-between, and for those attending NOPF, please bring physical copies of your chapbooks made from recycled/repurposed materials to exchange at this event, which will be an open reading and chapbook exchange. All are welcome. Please sign up here.


Sunday, Apr 21, 10:05am

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

Embodied Poetics: Threads of Matrilineal Influence

In this performance poets invite and trace threads of enlivening female influence. Which artists provide roots, architectures and constellations? What are our animating elemental permissions?  What is our artistic nourishment, in the form of tracing our resonant page mothers, sisters, and daughters? How is literary inheritance: garment, house, song, or breath? How do sound, presence, ritual and ethos translate into poetic aspirations of the present moment?  In what ways is our work in correspondence with our most potentially transformative realities?


Sunday, Apr 21, 10:05am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

Poem as circuit board, poem as honky-tonk, poem as theory: poets discuss the various forms imported into poems and the ways these forms activate certain performances of the texts and enact certain contents. Panelists explore methods of reading form, borrowing from such fields as dance to illuminate the tension between notation and performance. The writers on this panel make cases for the value of experiments in form and advocate for writing and reading practices that emphasize the form in performance.


Sunday, Apr 21, 11:10am

Rm 250, Healing Center

With:

How do we help each other sound most like ourselves? How do you workshop a book-length project? Our women’s workshop is comprised of six poets working in radically different forms and styles. In addition to doing workshop rounds on individual poems submitted by our members, the workshop also reviews participants’ larger works, including essays, chapbooks, and book-length projects. Over the past year, we’ve read and workshopped four members’ manuscripts, often checking in on the work at multiple points during the process: from initial inspiration to completed project. How do six very different poets weigh in on the order, emerging themes, length, and potential publishers for a manuscript? Moreover, how does the individual poet process and act on such advice? In this presentation, our panel will discuss different strategies and tracks for workshopping longer poem assemblages.

 


Sunday, Apr 21, 11:10am

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

With:

The aim of this panel is to bring together Latinx writers to discuss aspects of Latinx identity that are rarely explored even now when those identities are under attack by the alt-right. We are going to explore Spain's rich history of poetry that was written by Jewish, Islamic, Middle Eastern and Moorish writers both before the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella and afterwards and how these worldviews helped mold Spanish poetry as we know it and how it influenced some of Spain's most famous poets. In addition, we'll discuss how we write as Latinx of those diasporas and how we relate or do not relate to the literature of a colonizing nation that in addition to conquering the New World also exiled and executed many Jewish people leading to the Crypto Jew and converso phenomenon. In this panel we'll discuss forms such as the qasida and nunninya but also surrealism, magical realism, Kabbalah and other Sephardic and Middle Eastern contributions to world literature by way of Latin America and Iberian peninsula. 


Sunday, Apr 21, 11:15am

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

While living in rural Wisconsin, Lorine Niedecker encountered haiku through her correspondence with Cid Corman, an American poet living in Japan, and wrote a series of distinctive five-line poems that she published under the title “In Exchange for Haiku.” At around the same time, Scottish poet Ian Hamilton Finlay began decades of mailing his printed visual poems to friends on both sides of the Atlantic from his “avant-garden” in the Pentland Hills outside Edinburgh. A bit later, after being active in the Women's Rights Movement and studying at the New School in NYC, besmilr brigham retreated to a reclusive life in the Arkansas Ozarks, a place Frank Stanford also lived and wrote. Stanford's poems explore the Ozarks and the Mississippi River Delta region where he spent his childhood. 

This panel considers the work of Niedecker, Finlay, Stanford, brigham and other twentieth-century poets who lived outside of cities and looks at how they built communities and discovered sources of inspiration and influence through written correspondence. Panelists Adam Clay, Bronwen Tate, Matthew Henriksen, and MC Hyland will also discuss challenges to poetic engagement for rural poets that persist despite—or even as a result of—an increasingly networked world.


Sunday, Apr 21, 1:50pm

Rm 250, Healing Center

With:

The Blood-Jet Poetry Hour is a monthly poetry podcast series that features interviews with writers and artists of color about craft and identity politics. In a live poetry podcast recording, The Blood-Jet Poetry Hour co-hosts, Rachelle Cruz and Muriel Leung will be talking with Southern poets of color, Ching-In Chen, Tiana Nobile and Jacquelyn Brown about the idea of "arrival" in poetry. Arrival is a racialized concept that encompasses questions about citizenship, subjecthood, belonging, and the various ways in which identity is categorically placed within borders. We will ask: How does this political notion of arrival influence the ways in which we make art in our present time? In what ways are our arrivals halted or stalled? How do we maneuver this in our art? This panel of poets will try to answer these questions in reflection of their craft, political practice, and community-building efforts. 

This live poetry podcast recording will also feature advice about how to start your own poetry podcast, holding thoughtful conversations about craft, and highlight listener/audience feedback. The live recorded event will make up a special episode of The Blood-Jet Poetry Hour.


Sunday, Apr 21, 1:50pm

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

With:

Lavender Ink / Diálogos presents readings from new Spring releases.


Sunday, Apr 21, 1:50pm

RM 270, Healing Center

With:

“Poets and Publishing” brings together the dynamic worlds of poets, little magazine editors and publishers, librarians, and archivists to speak on the art of getting poetry into the world and keeping it there, past and present. Join Jonathan Penton, editor of Unlikely Stories Mark V,  Rosalyn Spencer, editor of Rigorous, Jim Elmborg, author of “A Pageant of Its Time”: Edward Dorn’s Slinger and the Sixties, Robert Riter, author of “The Documentary Lives of d.a. levy's Buddhist Third Class Junkmail Oracle,” and Jeff Weddle, author of Bohemian New Orleans: The Story of the Outsider and Loujon Press, for lively insights into the always fascinating world of literary publishing.


Sunday, Apr 21, 3:00pm

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

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This panel celebrates Marthe Reed’s ecological long poem, Ark Hive: a memoir of South Louisiana (The Operating System, 2019). In an extraordinary and personal meditation on one of the most ecologically vulnerable landscapes in the world, South Louisiana, Reed writes as an insider-outsider of the umwelt where she lived and taught for 11 years: “Here and not here, what to make of this place called home?” The text of Ark Hive unfolds in a constant state of oscillation: between prose and poetry, between English and French, French and Atakapa-Ishak, between celebration of and elegy for the “green bottomland forest, green coastal seas, green marsh grass—prairie tremblant—shifting in the wet.” As the title suggests, Ark Hive asks whether we can survive ourselves—our flooding, our oil industry—and if a new kind of sociality, a new way of being with others, may help ensure the survival of species, ourselves included. Marthe Reed died  before being able to see Ark Hive into the world. And so, this panel also aims to honor her legacy, her vision that a sense of community is integral to poetry itself.


Sunday, Apr 21, 3:00pm

RM 270, Healing Center

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In popular books like J. D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy, the Midwest stands in for the effects of neoliberalism—rust belt factories and abandoned towns serving as symbols for the broader movements and depredations of global capital. But these romanticize the actualities of an eroding ecological and cultural habitat. What are the naked costs of disinvestment, ecological devastation, racialized violence, and the financialization of everyday life? How might poetry stand as witness to and as protest against the decentralized power of neoliberal imperatives? In this panel, Emily Barton Altman, Toby Altman Laura Goldstein, Brenda Sieczkowski, and Keith S. Wilson present work that attempts to interrogate, map, and contest the dynamics of capital as they manifest and affect an emblematic site of American economic, political, and cultural life.

Emily Barton Altman’s long poem “The Seaway” charts the history of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Built to facilitate commerce between the Great Lakes and the globe, the Seaway became almost immediately obsolete due to changes in container technology. Nevertheless, it has served as a conduit for invasive species and devastated the ecology of the Lakes. Toby Altman’s new project To Feel Things and their Names engages the rural banks that modernist architect Louis Sullivan designed late in his career, taking up the problem that Sullivan tries to solve: can banking be reconciled with democracy? Laura Goldstein's new manuscript golden infection tracks the effects of the 2016 election, as well as everyday life in the Midwest, on herself and the various communities she's connected to. She uses the term "infection" metaphorically and literally, eventually drawing other poets in to infect the space of the poem in order to question and challenge fascism, capitalism and neoliberal individualism. Brenda Siezkowski’s “Dysplace,” uses a hybrid collage of prose and poetry to examine how the re-inscription and re-appropriation of (Midwest) urban spaces can offer strategies of survival in (and sanctuary from) spatial injustices produced and expressed by the culture(s) of neoliberal capitalism. Keith Wilson’s book Fieldnotes on Ordinary Love (Copper Canyon, 2019) has poems in it that deal with with race, class, and disenfranchisement in Chicago. He’s also working on visual poems, many of which deal with the same topics in Chicago as well as Central Ohio (where he lives now). These poems engage with typography and layout as instrumental to the lyric form of each poem.


Sunday, Apr 21, 3:00pm

Rm 250, Healing Center

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The apocalypse is already here, and we ourselves were the horsemen the whole time. What we do as writers is use poetry as a means of confronting the enormity of our future, the idea of "reckoning with our reckoning" being a necessary first step, but that confrontation inevitably involves more a long look in the mirror, as the apocalyptic imaginary forms a strategic intersection between our life and death drives: We recognize and even crave the sick justice of finally dying by our own hand and putting an end to the onslaught of indecipherable noise, but let's romp and revel a little more before the tide rolls in, eh? This panel will present four poets' takes on writing the apocalypse--however wide-reaching or personal their interpretations of that term. Rather than stick solely to the tenor of political discourse, then, much of the poetry presented will focus instead on issues of pleasure, intimacy and tenderness--what you would seek if you were personally given an expiration date--and the way such tenderness can and does turn violent. By looking at the way our own relationships reflect the sadistic urge to make our mark and have real influence over our environment, we can almost see that initial spectral spark behind the past 200 years of industrial violence against our planet as a classic example of intimacy-turned-abuse. The panel will also explore how place and eco-poetics can shape apocalyptic writing, as participants come together from various U.S. backgrounds including, among other foreboding American milieus, the rural North qua ghost town of the bygone middle class, the Appalachian opioid crisis and continued  exploitation through the Shale Revolution, and the Gulf Coast's own rising water levels and over-industrialized wetlands. New Orleans has long been famous for being the land falling into the sea, and we are the writers here to witness it--and acknowledge our close-knit complicity.    

 


Sunday, Apr 21, 3:00pm

Art Gallery, Healing Center

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Readings by featured poets.


Sunday, Apr 21, 4:10pm

Cafe Istanbul, Healing Center

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New Orleans based poets Brad Richard, Jerika Marchan, Elizabeth Gross, and Laura Mullen read from their work and examine the role of polyvocality in the poetics of disaster. How do multiple voices emerge and why? What strategies do we employ to move between different voices on the page? Is there an ethical responsibility to include different kinds of voices in work that responds to a real-world catastrophes? Reflecting on our own work and each other’s work, we’ll explore the implications of polyvocality in meaning, process, and form.


Sunday, Apr 21, 4:10pm

Healing Arts Conference Room, Healing Center

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In our era of escalating planetary peril, it can be difficult for writers to find artistic means that feel adequate to their task. However, many poets are devising compelling ways to record affective response, create communities of resistance, and generate new possibilities for consciousness. This panel will provide opportunities for participants to explore several widely various compositional approaches for writing climate change, through discussion and writing prompts led by contributors to Big Energy Poets: When Ecopoetry Thinks Climate Change (BlazeVOX, 2017). Participants will fulfill multiple prompts published in the anthology, sharing and discussing their results.


Sunday, Apr 21, 4:10pm

Rm 250, Healing Center

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In 1998, Unlikely Stories first appeared on the web, as a transgressive and counterculture outlet for literary art. In 2005, we began publishing under the Unlikely Books imprint, and continue to bring high standards of disturbing poetry to the world. Our five poets will openly discuss Trumpism, Bushism, poverty, the everyday cruelty of humans, and the spectre of Southern education (sexual and otherwise). Come meet New York’s Larissa Shmailo, Southerners Jeff Weddle, Wendy Taylor Carlisle, and C. Derick Varn, and Czech-German-Texan David E. Matthews as they explore the dysfunction of the mundane and the grand.